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Roe v. Wade Overturned by Jul 31, 2028

Question

Effective July 31, 2018, Supreme Court Justice Robert Kennedy will retire. This announcement sparked concerns in American left-wing media that the Supreme Court will be left with a right-wing skew that might jeopardize important left-wing jurisprudence. Most notably, there are concerns that Roe v. Wade, the decision which forbade abortion restrictions, will be overturned.

Roe established the individual right to abortion in 1973 during the first 2 trimesters of a pregnancy (approximately 2 weeks). Roe was later altered in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, reducing the individual's right to abortion to when it is not viable to safely deliver the fetus, which is commonly around 24 weeks of pregnancy, though the earliest patient to survive an early-term birth was born at 21 weeks and 5 days. Casey also found that states may not pass laws placing an undue burden for "the purpose or effect of placing a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a nonviable fetus"

Will Roe v. Wade be formally overturned by July 31, 2028?

This question will resolve positively if, between July 1 2018 to July 31 2028, the US Supreme Court overturns a previous ruling or upholds a state or federal law which bans elective abortions at some point before the date of fetal viability.

By "banning elective abortions", we mean for the purpose of this question any kind of criminal punishment, such as a felony, misdemeanor, infraction, or fine, as well as civil punishments such as allowing private parties to sue abortion practitioners or patients, or the revocation of medical or professional licenses. These punishments may be directed at individuals recieving abortions, individual doctors or medical professionals, or clinics and organizations who provide abortions, either punishing them for abortions performed or recieved, or making them effectively unable to perform/recieve an abortion.

[Dec 10, 2021] casens -- This question's resolution text has been altered, see the fine print for the original.

Before Dec 10, 2021, the question's resolution terms were as follows:

We specify this as follows. By 2028-07-31, will the SCOTUS uphold a state or federal law that bans elective abortions at least at some point before the 20th week of a pregnancy? Resolution is positive if, before the stipulated date,

1) SCOTUS accepts to hear a case in which at least one of the following statements holds:

1.1. A woman has been convicted* of a felony, misdemeanor or infraction for seeking an abortion at some point before the 20th week, for consenting to that abortion, and/or for having such an abortion.

1.2. A medical professional (nurse, doctor, etc.) has been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor or infraction for performing or attempting to perform an abortion at some point before the 20th week with the consent of the woman.

1.3 A clinic, hospital or other medical center has been closed by authorities on the basis of a federal or state ban on performing abortions at some point before the 20th week (but not because of regulations requiring specialized facilities, giving information to the patient, or other factors not involving an outright ban on performing the abortions).

1.4. A woman asked the federal courts to allow them to have an abortion before the 20th week despite a state or federal ban on the procedure.

AND

2) SCOTUS upholds the laws banning abortions in at least one of the cases described in 1.1-1.4, even if it might overturn one or more convictions for other reasons (e.g., procedural errors in the specific cases).

*In case the term "convicted" is not correct with regard to infractions, it's stipulated that any punishment for an infraction will also count, regardless of the le1) SCOTUS accepts to hear a case in which at least one of the following statements holds:

1.1. A woman has been convicted* of a felony, misdemeanor or infraction for seeking an abortion at some point before the 20th week, for consenting to that abortion, and/or for having such an abortion.

1.2. A medical professional (nurse, doctor, etc.) has been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor or infraction for performing or attempting to perform an abortion at some point before the 20th week with the consent of the woman.

1.3 A clinic, hospital or other medical center has been closed by authorities on the basis of a federal or state ban on performing abortions at some point before the 20th week (but not because of regulations requiring specialized facilities, giving information to the patient, or other factors not involving an outright ban on performing the abortions).

1.4. A woman asked the federal courts to allow them to have an abortion before the 20th week despite a state or federal ban on the procedure.

AND

2) SCOTUS upholds the laws banning abortions in at least one of the cases described in 1.1-1.4, even if it might overturn one or more convictions for other reasons (e.g., procedural errors in the specific cases).

*In case the term "convicted" is not correct with regard to infractions, it's stipulated that any punishment for an infraction will also count, regardless of the legal terminology.

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