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In the 2020 US presidential election, will Kanye West win more votes in any state than the difference between the first and second place finishers in that state?

Kanye Omari West, born June 8, 1977, is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer, composer, entrepreneur and fashion designer. West reportedly has a net worth in excess of $1 billion.

In September 2015, West announced that he intended to run for President of the United States in 2020. However, after the election of Donald Trump in 2016, it appeared that West would sit the 2020 election out, due to his proclaimed support for incumbent Donald Trump, who is seeking re-election in 2020.

On July 4 2020, West announced on Twitter that he would indeed seek the United States presidency in November 2020.

We must now realize the promise of America by trusting God, unifying our vision and building our future. I am running for president of the United States! #2020VISION

This question asks: Will there be any state in which Kanye West wins more votes than the difference between the first- and second-place finishers for that state?

There is no special resolution for the cases where West does not appear on the ballot in any state, does or does not actually campaign for votes, or even if he later formally endorses another candidate -- in these cases, we will still compare the number of total votes West receives against the difference between the first- and second-place finishes for each state.

Any votes cast for West as vice president do not count; only votes for West as president.

Votes for West will be counted regardless of whether he formally appears on the ballot or campaigns as a write-in candidate.

Vote totals will be pulled from the New York Times, CNN, or FiveThirtyEight -- in the event that there is a dispute, it will be decided when the FEC eventually releases its formal election results publication (ex: https://www.fec.gov/resources/cms-content/doc… but for 2020).

Related: https://www.metaculus.com/questions/4761/if-h…

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