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N-S existence & smoothness proved true

Question

This question is linked to a fortified essay on the Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness problem. Read the essay to learn more.

The Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness conjecture is an important open problem in fluid dynamics and the theory of partial differential equations. It's been designated as one of the Clay Institute's Millennium Prize Problems in 2000 and there is a 1 million dollar bounty available for either proving or disproving the conjecture. In the official introduction to the problem here, the Clay Institute splits the problem into four statements A, B, C and D; and the problem is considered to have been settled if any one of them is proven.

When will the Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness conjecture be proved true?

This question will resolve to the date in which the Millennium Prize for the proof of the Navier-Stokes existence and smoothness conjecture is awarded before the resolution date of this question for either a proof of statement A or statement B. It will resolve as > if the Millennium Prize is awarded for the proof of the breakdown of the equations, in other words for a proof of C or D; or if neither event takes place until the resolution time of the question.

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